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  • efficiency definition physics
  • energy efficiency definition physics
  • mechanical efficiency definition physics
  • physics definition of efficiency
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    cooking with gas Operating at maximum efficiency; performing well, functioning smoothly; really in the groove or on the right track. The expression probably comes from the efficiency of gas as a cooking medium (as contrasted with coal, wood, kerosene, electricity, etc.). Occasionally the phrase is jocularly updated by variants such as cooking with electricity or cooking with radar .

    For example, one may measure how directly two objects are communicating: downloading music directly from a computer to a mobile device is more efficient than using a mobile device's microphone [6] to record music sounds that come from a computer's speakers.

    One of the most common definitions for efficiency in physics is a measurement of how much of the desired work or product is obtained from each unit of energy invested into that task or product. An additional definition of efficiency is based on the total amount of energy required to produce a specific amount of a product. Both definitions fall under the category of first law efficiency because they are derived from the first law of thermodynamics.